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Jorge Delgado III, center, poses with his parents Jorge Delgado, Jr. and Patti Foreman during an event at Micky Fins in West Ocean City last Friday, where he announced he would be running for Congress in 2020. 

(Sept. 27, 2019) For 30-year-old Jorge Delgado, the time for change is now, as he campaigns for a chance to lead Maryland’s First Congressional District in 2020. 

“I’m excited to get in there to add a voice of reason, a voice of common sense and to shake things up,” he said. 

The Maryland native and Ocean City resident entered the political world after graduating from Auburn University with a bachelor’s degree in international business. 

Colorado Republican Congressman Scott Tipton recruited the Auburn alumnus in 2012, and Delgado said his time with Tipton helped him learn the challenges faced by small businesses and rural communities. 

He moved on and had a successful stint as campaign manager for then Colorado State Rep. Clarice Navarro, who later resigned to take a post in the Trump Administration, and then found himself working for the National Republican Senatorial Committee as aide to the chairman. 

Most recently, Delgado was the economic policy advisor for Sen. Cory Gardner (R-Colorado) and focused on affordable housing, taxation, opportunity zones and other relative issues. 

Delgado said he decided to run for Congress because he was frustrated with how lackadaisical Washington leaders seemed to be toward a growing list of global and domestic crises. 

“You can see what is occurring with Iran, North Korea, Russia, and then you look locally as far as [the] opioid epidemic, cyber threats—I mean the challenges seem to be endless,” he said. 

He said rather than fixing these issues, House lawmakers were distracting themselves with “media antics.” 

In addition, he found that the Republican Party was trailing Democrats in mobilizing younger voters. 

 “The youth now, I believe, we are stepping up,” he said. “Young people are engaged, and I want to prove that not only are we engaged, but we want a seat at the table.

“You look at the leadership there and you would be hard pressed to find anyone … who is under 70,” he continued. “The definition of doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results is insanity.”

Delgado said his youth was an advantage, and hopes to use it to energize and mobilize the Republican Party. 

If he wins the election in November next year, he would become the youngest Republican in Congress. 

Speaking of youth, Delgado also made it a point to mention something that also motivated him to run for Congress. 

“Polling suggests that people 30 and younger now have a more favorable view of socialism than they do of the free market,” he said. “That to me is baffling, and that’s why…I can no longer be on the sidelines anymore. I want to add my voice to the conversation and show that there are values in the free market system.” 

Delgado pointed to Venezuela as an example, noting that, despite its rich supply of oil, it was currently facing an economic crisis. 

“We [Americans] may have our challenges, but we are the most fortunate people on this Earth,” Delgado said. “The best part of this country is we have always had challenges, but we’ve always been a resilient nation and have overcome those [them].” 

Voters will choose between Delgado and incumbent Rep. Andy Harris in the primary election on April 28, 2020. 

Currently, the only candidate running for the Democrat spot at this time is Mia Mason, a 20-year veteran of the United States Navy, Army and District of Colombia National Guard. 

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