Shoaling

On Thursday, Aug. 8, the vessel was able to dredge approximately 1,000 cubic yards of sand from the inlet channel, at shoaling hot spots between buoys 11 and 12.

(Aug. 16, 2019) Despite being scheduled for five days of work, the dredge Currituck and its crew departed Ocean City Inlet last Friday after just a day of maintenance dredging there.

“The dredge’s are in such high demand … and their schedules are always so in flux that it’s unfortunately not uncommon for them to end up here today, gone tomorrow, then back again,” U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Spokesman Chris Gardner said. 

The Currituck returned to a maintenance yard in North Carolina Friday morning.

Although the vessel and its crew were only able to spend a day doing maintenance work in the inlet, it still managed to accomplish quite a bit, according to the Corps.

On Thursday, Aug. 8, the vessel was able to dredge approximately 1,000 cubic yards of sand from the inlet channel, at shoaling hot spots between buoys 11 and 12. 

These locations are typical trouble areas for mariners, Gardner said. 

To put this into perspective, it would take about 100 commercial dump trucks to remove that amount of sediment. 

Sediment from the inlet will be taken to offshore of the northern area of Assateague Island, where it’ll be used to combat erosion on the south of the inlet. 

The vessel is scheduled to return to the Ocean City Inlet in a few weeks, but the exact date has not be set.

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.